Explore what makes Butte County great!


When you’re ready to explore Butte County, check out Explore Butte County’s Experience Passes. The passes bring together the best attractions, adventures, and savings in one convenient location. Passes are delivered directly to your phone via text and email! Whether you’re here for a weekend or a week, take advantage of all that Butte County has to offer. Get your passes today to begin your next adventure!

  • Hike Butte County trails and check-in on your mobile device to track your progress
  • Free to participate, no app to download
  • Mobile exclusive
  • Instantly delivered via text and email
  • No apps to download
  • Hike, bike, and paddle the best of Butte County
  • Check-in along the way to win!

How this Pass Works

Step 1 - Get Your Pass

These mobile exclusive passes are a collection of savings, outdoor adventures, and other experiences in Butte County.

Step 2 - Receive Text

After you sign-up, your pass will be instantly delivered to your phone via text and email and is ready to use immediately! There is no app to download. If you want one-tap access to your pass, you have the option of saving it to your phone’s home screen.

Step 3 - Redeem

When checking in to a location, you will need to be within a .25 mile radius of the check-in spot to redeem on your pass.


Hiking is a great way to explore Butte County—we have hundreds of miles of trails that are perfect for hiking in Northern California. From the southernmost border to the highest peak, we’ve put together a list of 35 hikes and hiking trails in Butte County so that you can #AdventureButteCA. Whether you’re new to hiking and are looking for some Northern California hikes to explore or have multiple multi-day excursions under your belt, there’s a hike on this list for you!

All hike information includes:

  • the name of the hike
  • key information about city
  • length and time of year to visit
  • hike description
  • a link to the trail map
  • driving directions to the parking area to access the hike (these will be the most accurate for several of the included hikes; the “Map” link takes you to the check-in coordinates, not the parking area)
  • the check-in location to keep track of trails completed (the check-in location is not always the trailhead)

Now, sign up for the pass and hit the trails!

Click here to see all included hikes!

  • Hike Butte County trails and check-in on your mobile device to track your progress
  • Free to participate, no app to download

Easy Hikes

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Chico Seed Orchard
Chico. 1 mile loop. Accessible year-round. Wheelchair accessible. Dogs allowed on leash.

Also known as the Mendocino National Forest Genetic Resource Center, the Chico Seed Orchard is a paved mile-long loop that’s accessible to the whole family (note: the path is uneven in several spots due to underground roots). There, you’ll find a variety of trees and plants with interpretive signs as well as a beautiful bamboo grove with Comanche Creek running through the area. Once you’ve completed the paved loop, explore the other unofficial, unpaved trails available. The main, drive-in gate is open Monday through Friday from 7am-3pm, while the pedestrian gate is open seven days a week from 7am through 7pm in the summer and from 7am through 5pm in the winter.
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Chico State University Campus Arboretum
Chico. Around 1.2 mile out-and-back, but mileage can vary. Accessible year-round. Dogs allowed on leash.

Located throughout campus and running along Big Chico Creek, the Chico State Campus Arboretum makes for a beautiful and easy urban “hike.” Starting at the Physical Sciences Building, discover over 200 species of woody plants and trees from all over the world as you stroll next to Big Chico Creek through campus. From the brown bridge near the Physical Sciences building, follow the bike path trail west, out past the tennis courts and take a left towards the University greenhouses where the path will end at the train tracks. On your return trip, cross one of the many foot bridges across the creek to explore more of the campus, including the iconic Kendall Hall and Bell Memorial Union, to get the full college experience.
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Feather River Trail
Oroville. 3.6 mile out-and-back. Accessible year-round. Dogs allowed on leash.

Running along the river that gives it its name, the Feather River Trail starts at Riverbend Park and meanders east upstream (right from the soccer fields) to Table Mountain Blvd. The paved trail and multiple access points make it a popular spot for walkers, bikers, families, those who use wheelchairs, and those with dogs. Use one of those access points to get to the top of the levee along Arlin Rhine Memorial Dr. to see some of the city’s most popular spots, including the Oroville Chinese Temple and Centennial Plaza. Back on the trail, you can see spawning bass and salmon in the spring and fall, wading fishers in the winter, and, at the end of the trail, a great view of the historic Table Mountain bridge any time of year.

If you’re looking to extend your walk, cross Table Mountain Blvd. for a visit to the Feather River Nature Center and Bath House, or cross the old Table Mountain Bridge and explore the unique views at the Feather River Fish Hatchery.
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Gray Lodge Wildlife Area Loop
Gridley. 1.8 mile loop. Accessible year-round. Lands Pass required (complete online or pay in cash on-site). Dogs allowed on leash.

You’ll find two easy, flat trails at the Gray Lodge—the first is the main 1.8-mile unpaved trail, the second is a wheelchair accessible paved trail that you can add to the main trail to slightly extend your trek. This is a great spot for those with kids, those looking for an easy stroll, and those looking for an amazing bird watching location during the winter months, with peak birding November through January (so bring your binoculars!). Mosquitos are abundant, so make sure to bring bug spray, especially if you visit around dusk.
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Jonesville Canyon
Jonesville. 3.8 mile out-and-back. Best used May-October. Dogs allowed.

The Jonesville Canyon trail takes you near the headwaters of Butte Creek. Even though it’s one of the lowest elevation High Country hikes in Butte County, you’ll still get the benefits of a cooler summer hike compared to the heat in the Valley below. You’ll enjoy wildflower blooms later into the summer up here, starting in June and peaking in July, and spectacular falls colors in October. Be prepared for two creek crossings, which may be dangerous to cross early in the season. You’ll find them relatively safe to cross when the snow at the Humbug Weather Station has dropped to zero. The access road is also closed due to snow annually, so make sure to plan your visit accordingly.
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Little Chico Creek Bike Path
Chico. 4 miles out-and-back. Accessible year-round. Wheelchair accessible. Dogs allowed on leash.

Begin your walk parallel to Little Chico Creek along this paved path, which takes you through quiet residential areas on one side and, during the rainy season, a small creek and trees on the other. The paved path is accessible to joggers, bikers, and those who use wheelchairs.
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Lower Bidwell Park
Chico. Mileage varies between 1 and 5 miles. Accessible year-round. Dogs allowed.

A hike through Lower Bidwell Park takes you through the mellow half of Chico’s famed Bidwell Park and diverse views throughout the year. In the fall, the park is full of vibrant oranges, reds, and yellows of changing foliage, while in the spring, it comes alive with seasonal wildflowers. With a start at the “Decide or Ride” compass, located adjacent to the One-Mile Recreation Area bike and pedestrian bridge, you’ll have the freedom to choose your own adventure through Lower Park. The paved path creates an accessible loop, while the unpaved trail will take you on an out-and-back journey.
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Monkey Face Loop
Chico. Around 1 mile, but mileage can vary. Best used February-May. Dogs allowed on leash.

Overlooking Bidwell Park from the top, the Monkey Face Loop is one of the most trails popular in the park. Generally accessible year-round, you’ll enjoy it the most April through May and September through November when it’s dry and not too hot. Though the trail is rocky, it’s still easily accessed by most, with great views without much exertion, though a steep 300-feet elevation gain offers the right amount of challenge. Everyone in the family will love looking out over the park and getting the perfect sunset photo for social media. From parking lot E, take one of the many trails up to the face exploring the outcroppings.
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Paradise Lake
Magalia. Easy. $3 Parking Fee. $10 boating fee (electric trolling motors only). Dogs Not Allowed. Closed on Wednesdays. Best April-November. Poor cell service; make sure to take a photo for check-in if needed.

Paradise Lake is a postcard picture of a serene forested lake with canoes lazily drifting atop glassy water. With 244 acres, there’s plenty of space to explore the calm waters on a kayak, canoe, or row-boat. Small boats with electric trolling motors are also allowed. Fishers will also find Paradise Lake a quiet spot for dropping a line, whether from the water or along the shore.

To enjoy your time on the water, make sure all you, and everyone you're with, is able to swim and wears a personal flotation device/life jacket. If the location is new to you, first scout the location so you know where to get on and off the water.
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Pine Creek Loop
Chico. 1-2 mile loop. Best used April-November (prone to flooding December-March). Dogs allowed on leash.

Slow down, way down, when strolling around the Pine Creek Unit of the Sacramento River National Wildlife Refuge. Just outside the bustle of Chico, this protected land is home to abundant wildlife and migratory birds, with two easy-to-follow trails—one around 1 mile and the other around 2 miles—to enjoy. There are also two picnic areas to help you enjoy your time. Bring the whole family and the binoculars!
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Rattlesnake Hill Trail
Oroville. 1.2-mile loop. Accessible year-round. Wheelchair accessible. Parking pass required ($8). Dogs not allowed.

Coiling around the hill above the North Thermalito Forebay, the Rattlesnake Hill Trail is a small, twisting, paved trail that’s easily accessible for walkers, joggers, and wheelchair users. Technically an open loop, both ends of the trail cross the Brad Freeman bicycle trail that runs past the Forebay to the Afterbay, which you’ll walk along to get back to your starting point. Look for a bench at the top of the hill, where you’ll be able to see Oroville, Thermalito and the sparkling waters of the North Forebay below, Table Mountain to the left, and the Sutter Buttes across the valley to the right.
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Thermalito Diversion Pool Trail
Oroville. 6.4 mile out-and-back. Accessible year-round. Dogs not allowed.

Part of the much longer Brad Freeman Trail and featuring lake views, the northern side of the Thermalito Diversion Pool Section of the trail is a popular hiking, mountain biking, and kayaking spot—so feel free to enjoy the easy out-and-back hike and then try your hand at your own mini triathlon. Or just enjoy the hike. We won’t judge.

For another easy hike, check out the southern side of the Thermalito Diversion Pool section of the Brad Freeman Trail, which runs parallel to the Dan Beebe Trail (more on that later) and takes you through an old train tunnel.
For a far more challenging hike, try your hand on more of the Brad Freeman Trail—which we cover in the “Moderate” hikes section.
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Yahi Trail
Chico. 7.9 mile out-and-back. Accessible year-round. Dogs allowed on leash.

There are plenty of reasons why the pedestrian-only Yahi Trail is one of the most popular hikes in Bidwell Park: a variety of micro-environments, Big Chico Creek, large shady sycamores, and beautiful spring wildflower blooms. You’ll find great spots to stop for picnics, swim in the creek, and lay out and relax. Make sure to bring a swimsuit and water shoes for enjoying a dip in one of the many natural swimming holes you’ll pass. If you’re looking for a change of scenery on the way back, walk back along Upper Park Road instead of returning along the creek.

If you don't have time for the full Yahi Trail experience, it's only about 1.5 miles to the iconic Bear Hole from the start of the trail.
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Moderate Hikes

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Annie Bidwell Trail
Chico. 8.8 mile out-and-back (9.4 miles from Chico Canyon Trailhead to 10 Mile House Trail). Best used March-November. Dogs allowed on leash.

The Annie Bidwell Trail starts off with short, punchy climbs up to the rim of the canyon, and follows with a steep, rocky downhill. At the bottom, you’ll enjoy a nice meadow and several swimming opportunities, followed by more climbing and drops, making it a moderate-to-challenging trail. Though it’s open year-round, the trail gets muddy in the rainy season; your best experience will be in the spring during wildflower season and in the fall during the color changes. Find the easiest parking at the end of Chico Canyon Road.
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Bidwell Canyon Trail
Oroville. 9 mile out-and-back. Accessible year-round. Dogs allowed on leash.

Starting at the Saddle Dam Day Use Area and ending up near the Lake Oroville Visitor Center, you’ll enjoy this hike out to great views of Lake Oroville on Bidwell Canyon Trail (aka, Kelly Ridge Point Trail). Expect stretches of gradual but extended inclines and declines throughout your trek, making for a moderately strenuous experience. The views at Kelly Ridge Point are worth it, though—you’ll see the back side of Oroville Dam, the Bidwell Bar Suspension Bridge and can even dip your toes in the water (when levels are high) before returning. Feel free to stop by the Lake Oroville Visitor Center for another great view on the lookout tower.

Make this a point-to-point by hiking through to the Oroville Dam Day Use Area and getting picked up there. You can also slightly decrease the return trip by arranging for pick-up at the Bidwell Canyon Marina; since it’s a state park, there’s usually a parking fee, but your ride can ask for a free 10-minute pass to pick you up.
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Big Chico Creek Ecological Reserve
Forest Ranch. 2-3 miles out and back. Accessible year-round. Dogs not allowed.

Containing 3,950 acres of diverse habitats, 4.5 miles of Big Chico Creek, and countless species of flora and fauna, the Big Chico Creek Ecological Reserve (BCCER) offers a variety of trails to explore. From the gated entrance on 14 Mile House Road, you start with a shorter hike on Loop Meadows Trail or venture further with longer and harder hikes along Chico Canyon, Maslin Trail, or Musty Buck Ridge Road.
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Big Chico Creek Loop / T-Ford Loop
Chico. 10 mile loop. Best used April-November. Dogs allowed on leash.

Whether you call it Big Chico Creek Loop, T-Ford Loop, or Yahi/Annie Bidwell Loop, the experience is the same: a high-quality trek in Upper Bidwell Park looping around Big Chico Creek. A combination of the previously mentioned Yahi Trail and Annie Bidwell Trail, the best time for hiking this loop is fall through spring; if you do it in the summer, tackle it in the morning or plan on dips in the creek along the way. Be prepared to be wowed by the variety of micro-environments, shady sycamores, and Lovejoy basalt along. You’ll have to ford Big Chico Creek to go from the Yahi Trail to the Annie Bidwell side, but that’s definitely part of the fun! Just be cautious and use your best judgment when doing so—it can be dangerous after it rains, when it’s flowing faster, and in the winter and spring, when the water is colder; from December through March, it is likely impassible.

If you’re still building up your mileage or aren’t quite ready to ford the creek, have fun returning to the Yahi Trail and Annie Bidwell Trails individually.
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Butte Creek Trail
Magalia. Moderate. 2.4 mile out-and-back. Accessible June-October. Dogs allowed. Poor cell service; make sure to take a photo for check-in if needed.

Discover the remote Forks of Butte Creek Recreation Area along the Butte Creek Trail. Starting at Doe Mill Bridge, the trail travels south along the west side of Butte Creek before ending along the canyon’s edge. Once you get past the big staircase towards the end of the hike the trail gets steeper and eventually ends. We recommend you go as far as you’re comfortable, but this is a good hike for the adventurous of all ages. We categorized this trail as moderate for the driving adventure alone (and recommend coming in a truck, SUV, or other 4W drive vehicle)!
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Colby Mountain Lookout/Colby Meadows
Near Butte Meadows. 7.3 - 9.6 mile loop. Accessible May-October. Dogs allowed.

Offering a variety of snow-covered cross-country skiing and snowmobiling trails in the winter, Colby Mountain Lookout/Colby Meadows is just as fun when explored on foot. It’s higher elevation location makes it a great spot for summer hikes, with lots of shade and cooler temperatures compared to the valley below. Enjoy a shorter, intermediate hike by staying on the trails in Colby Meadows south of Colby Mountain Lookout, or add a few miles and difficulty by looping around and up to the lookout for expansive views.
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Dan Beebe Trail
Oroville. 11.9 mile point-to-point (shuttle required). Accessible year-round. Dogs not allowed.

Starting at Saddle Dam at Lake Oroville and meandering up Kelly Ridge and past the Lake Oroville Visitor Center, the Dan Beebe Trail takes you on a scenic journey past Oroville Dam down to the Lakeland Trailhead near Downtown Oroville. The equestrian-accessible trail features lake and river views, beautiful spring greenery, and nice views from the top of Sycamore Hill. You’ll want to set up a shuttle to drop you off at the start and pick you up at the end.

If you’re not quite ready to tackle all 12 miles at once, start at the Oroville Dam Upper Overlook Day Use Area to either head east to Saddle Dam for a roughly 5-mile hike or head west to the Lakeland Trailhead for a 7-mile adventure.
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Humboldt Peak To Cold Springs
Butte Meadows. 6.8 mile point-to-point, shuttle required. Best used July-October. Dogs on leash allowed.

Discover some great views along the highest ridge in Butte County as you hike from Humboldt Peak to Cold Springs. Following the Pacific Crest Trail, you’ll travel by the county’s highest point to the clear, cold water of Cold Springs at Humbug Summit. Overall, you’ll enjoy a mild hike, but the 1000-foot total elevation gain pushes this to a moderately challenging one. You’ll want to arrange a shuttle for drop-off and pick-up. (If you plan on making this small part of a long-distance trek along the PCT, make sure to get the appropriate permit)
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Lime Saddle Memorial Park Trail
Oroville. 3.8 mile out-and-back. Accessible year-round. Dogs allowed on leash.

Located on the northwestern side of Lake Oroville along the West Branch of the Feather River Arm, the Lime Saddle Memorial Park Trail starts from the trailhead near the intersection of Pentz Rd. and Lime Saddle Rec Road and travels north to wrap around the Lime Saddle Campground area and features lake views. Enjoy acres of rolling hills dotted with trees and views of the marinas (and in the Spring, delight in the wildflowers that will be in bloom) in a less-populated hiking area. Park in the gravel lot at the intersection of Lime Saddle Rec Rd. and Pentz Rd and then walk left, through the chain link fence, to get to the trail.
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Loafer Creek Loop Trail
Oroville. 3.6 mile loop. Accessible year-round. Parking fee required (State Recreation Area). Dogs not allowed.

Accessible from all three campgrounds in the Loafer Creek Campground, the Loafer Creek Loop Trail is perfect for hikers and equestrians. Enjoy rolling hills and a few steeper climbs and descents along the tree-lined trail. You can also access the rest of Lake Oroville’s extensive trail system by crossing Saddle Dam to increase the mileage on this otherwise moderate hike. With the trail overlapping others in the area, you’ll want to make sure to study the interactive map before your trip!
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Middle Trail-Live Oak-Upper Trail
Chico. 4.2 mile loop. Accessible year-round. Dogs allowed.

Upper Bidwell Park’s Middle Trail is a staple, and the Middle Trail-Live Oak-Upper Trail Loop will provide a fun and not-too-hard challenge. Starting and ending at Horseshoe Lake, the hike east along Middle Trail is easy and relatively flat. At the Live Oak Trail marker, begin your ascent to Upper Trail, which is steep with some rocky terrain. Once atop the bluff, Upper Trail back to the parking area is wide and easy to follow. Upper Trail and Live Oak are multi-use trails, so watch for mountain bikers along the narrow Live Oak trail. Make sure to download the Upper Bidwell Park map (or pick up a paper copy from the Chico Chamber or the City of Chico Parks Department) prior to your hike to familiarize yourself with where to find the trailhead and to use on the hike, as cell service is weak and spotty on the trail.
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North Rim Trail
Chico. 8.4 mile out-and-back. Accessible year-round. Park in Parking Area B. Dogs allowed on leash.

One of the longest trails in Upper Bidwell Park and a gateway to a variety of different loop options, North Rim Trail is a worthwhile trip on its own. As it runs parallel to the edge of the park, you’ll get sweeping views of the park in all directions as you gain elevation, including a rocky look-out point at the trail’s end.
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Phantom Falls
Oroville. 4.2 mile out-and-back. Best used November-April. Lands Pass Required $4.58. Dogs allowed on leash.

While finding the trail is a little tricky, once you do find it, the hike to Phantom Falls is a fairly easy one. The waterfall runs during the rainy season, and in the spring, wildflowers carpet the North Table Mountain Ecological Reserve. There’s no shade, so make sure to wear a hat and sunscreen, and you’ll definitely want to go early to avoid the crowds during peak wildflower season.

This is a cross country trail, and it is highly recommended that you download the free Avenza map below, before beginning your hike. From the parking area follow the trail straight, and look for a trail going towards your right. Head towards a pile of black rocks and continue North. Follow the cattle grazing trail, searching for a downhill path towards Ravine Falls. Depending on what season you go, Ravine Falls might be dried up but there is clear signage for it when you get there. Then you will make your way up a mild incline and across the rolling hills towards Phantom Falls. Even if Phantom Falls is dry, you’ll know you’ve arrived because of the panoramic views of the canyon. It is easy to get lost on the cross-country trail, so make sure you check in with your map regularly, and make sure your GPS point is following the trail. *Please note that we have described the cross country-route on the Avenza map to ensure that you stay on CDFW land.
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Roy Rogers-Loafer Creek Loop
Oroville. Moderate. 5 mile loop, Accessible year-round, Park at Brooks Orchard Picnic Area.

By itself, the Roy Rogers Trail is a two-mile trail that connects via the northern part of the Loafer Creek Loop, but it is often combined with the aforementioned Loafer Creek trail to create an approximately 5-mile loop. Along the whole loop, you’ll likely pass equestrians also enjoying the trail while enjoying lake views. Starting at Brooks Orchard, the trail is more challenging, with a stretch of frequent ups and downs, but is otherwise mild the rest of the way.
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South Rim Trail
Chico. 3.4 mile out-and-back. Accessible year-round. Dogs allowed on leash.

Hugging the south-east border of Upper Bidwell Park, the South Rim Trail offers up big views of Big Chico Creek Canyon’s—you guessed it—southern rim. Starting from Peregrine Point, descend over the rocky trail until you hit the Annie Bidwell Trail, and then enjoy the return ascent to really appreciate the expansive vista from the top.
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Yellowstone Kelly Heritage Trail
Paradise. 4.3 point-to-point; shuttle required. Accessible year-round. Dogs allowed on leash.

Starting at the Paradise Depot Museum, the Yellowstone Kelly Heritage Trail (formerly the Paradise Memorial Trailway) offers a converted, paved “rails-to-trails” path that runs parallel to Skyway for much of its length. Along the five-mile trail, you’ll encounter sections featuring dense tree cover that creates a lovely illusion of wilderness in the suburban setting and sections where with minimal tree coverage or shade, so prepare accordingly.

To make this an easier outing, drive to the northern trailhead in Magalia near the intersection of Pentz Rd. and Skyway so that you’re walking downhill most of the way.

Want a challenging trek? Double it by making it an out-and-back instead of arranging for a point-to-point pickup. Or, start at the northern trailhead so that you walk uphill on the return trip.

You can also make it more challenging by going to the south trailhead, located at the “Town of Paradise - Welcome” sign at the intersection of Skyway and Neal Rd., you’ll find nearby shopping centers with ample parking.
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Difficult Hikes

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Bidwell Park Tour
Chico. 15.5 mile loop. Closed during wet weather. Dogs allowed on leash.

The Bidwell Park Tour is a challenging trek along the most popular trails on both sides of the park—North Rim on the north side and Guardian Trail on the south side, linked by B Trail and Ten Mile House Road. A wet crossing of Big Chico Creek is required to pass from B Trail on the northern to Ten Mile House Road on the southern side, but you’ll be rewarded with great views of the valley and the park itself for the trail’s duration. Make sure to bring lots of water, as it’s recommended to do the trail in its entirety to get the full experience.
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Guardian Trail-Bloody Pin-Annie Bidwell Trail Loop
Chico. Chico. 8.3 mile loop. Accessible year-round. Dogs allowed on leash.

Guardian Trail is one of the most popular trails in Chico, hugging the southern rim of Chico Creek Canyon and providing great views. For a little bit of everything that makes the trail, and Upper Park in general, so great, you’ll want to check out the Guardian Trail-Bloody Pin-Annie Bidwell Trail Loop, starting and ending at the Chico Canyon Trailhead. You’ll be challenged on frequent up-and-down elevation changes (great thigh workout!), switchbacks along the Bloody Pin section, punchy climbs, rocky sections, flat and exposed sections, and even some off-trail spots to stop and enjoy the views.
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Many Waterfalls Cross-Country Loop
Oroville. 11.3 mile loop. Best season November-April. Lands Pass Required $4.58. Dogs allowed on leash.

If you’re not willing to get wet and muddy, then the Many Waterfalls Cross-Country Loop is not the trail for you...but then you’d be missing out on a seriously beautiful hike. Taking you around Table Mountain during the rainy season, this loop will have at least nine waterfalls, with 14 flowing within a few days of a major rainstorm and all of them dry during the summer. It’s a fleeting beauty worth seeing. Enjoy the most waterfalls January and February and then the wildflowers February through mid-April. It is easy to get lost on the cross-country trail, so we recommend downloading the free Avenza Maps app and the Many Waterfalls Trail map before your hike so that you can follow the GPS coordinates in real-time on your hike.
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North Rim Loop
Chico. 10.2 mile loop. Accessible year-round. Dogs allowed on leash.

A Chico classic, North Rim Loop (sometimes referred to as Upper Bidwell Trail)—traversing North Rim Trail, B-Trail, and Yahi Trail —offers a little bit of everything that makes Bidwell Park so special: swimming holes for summer dips, springtime wildflowers, wild animals, and more. The length, rocky terrain, and elevation loss and gain make this a difficult trail, but first-timers to Chico should still put this on their “Must Visit” list. (Keep an eye out for mountain bikers racing down B-Trail!). To get from B-Trail to Yahi Trail, you’ll need to briefly follow Upper Park Road.

Those still working on building their mileage can shave off a little time and distance by starting at Horseshoe Lake instead of Lot B. You can also shave off the end of the Yahi Trail by cutting over to Upper Park Road closer to the B-Trail at Lot S near Browns Hole.
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North Rim To B Trail To Middle Trail
Chico. 9.9 mile loop. Accessible year-round. Dogs allowed on leash.

A collection of popular Upper Bidwell Park trails, the North Rim-B Trail-Middle Trail Loop will both push you and reward you. The North Rim Trail is a slow and rocky climb with great views to B Trail, which descends through many twists and turns among valley oaks and manzanita trees to the previously mentioned Middle Trail. You’ll walk along the Middle Trail for a little bit to get onto North Rim. Make sure to look at the map before heading out - Middle Trail has a lot of unsigned intersecting trails, but you’ll find signage at the intersection of Middle Trail and B Trail.

If you’re still building up strength and endurance, hike North Rim and Middle Trail individually over a couple of days—and then then come back to tackle the loop in its entirety. You can also shorten the loop by starting at Horseshoe Lake.
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Upper Bidwell Park Loop-South Side
Chico. 12.7 mile loop. Accessible year-round. Dogs allowed on leash.

An extended version of the previously mentioned Guardian Trail-Bloody Pin-Annie Bidwell Trail Loop, the Upper Bidwell Park Loop - South Side takes you along the park’s southern rim and multiple popular trails—Annie Bidwell Trail, Guardian Trail, and 10 Mile House Trail—for an epic and challenging exploration of Upper Bidwell Park. You’ll be rewarded with equally epic views and the chance to discover something new in trails you’ve previously traversed on their own or in a different combination. After all, the trails in Upper Bidwell Park are too good to hike just once. For this loop, start north at the Green Gate near Ten Mile House Road.
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Hike, Bike, and Paddle your way around Butte County!

Choose your adventure with the Explore Butte County Adventure Pass, featuring 30 scenic spots where you can Hike, Bike, and Paddle around some of the area's most beautiful natural and urban scenes.

EXPLORE
Take to the trails and explore more than 300 miles of hiking, biking, and paddling along Butte County’s network of trails and waterways. Discover parks, preserves, wetlands, and fun activities along the way!

WIN
When you check in for at least 3 adventures, you are eligible for an exclusive Hike, Bike & Paddle sticker.

SAVE
Check out exclusive discounts from these local businesses: Almendra Winery & Distillery, Forebay Aquatic Center, Secret Trail Brewing Company, Union, and Upper Park Clothing!

AND, with each check-in, you’ll also earn an entry to our quarterly drawings. The more you check in, the more entries you earn! (See official terms and conditions for full details)

Share your Adventure Pass photos! Use #AdventureButteCA on social media for your chance to be featured.

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Hike

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Annie Bidwell Trail
Chico. 8.8 mile out-and-back (9.4 miles from Chico Canyon Trailhead to 10 Mile House Trail). Best used March-November. Dogs allowed on leash.

The Annie Bidwell Trail starts off with short, punchy climbs up to the rim of the canyon, and follows with a steep, rocky downhill. At the bottom, you’ll enjoy a nice meadow and several swimming opportunities, followed by more climbing and drops, making it a moderate-to-challenging trail. Though it’s open year-round, the trail gets muddy in the rainy season; your best experience will be in the spring during wildflower season and in the fall during the color changes. Find the easiest parking at the end of Chico Canyon Road.
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Big Chico Creek Ecological Reserve
Forest Ranch. 2-3 miles out and back. Accessible year-round. Dogs not allowed.

Containing 3,950 acres of diverse habitats, 4.5 miles of Big Chico Creek, and countless species of flora and fauna, the Big Chico Creek Ecological Reserve (BCCER) offers a variety of trails to explore. From the gated entrance on 14 Mile House Road, you start with a shorter hike on Loop Meadows Trail or venture further with longer and harder hikes along Chico Canyon, Maslin Trail, or Musty Buck Ridge Road.
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Butte Creek Trail
Magalia. Moderate. 2.4 mile out-and-back. Accessible June-October. Dogs allowed. Poor cell service; make sure to take a photo for check-in if needed.

Discover the remote Forks of Butte Creek Recreation Area along the Butte Creek Trail. Starting at Doe Mill Bridge, the trail travels south along the west side of Butte Creek before ending along the canyon’s edge. Once you get past the big staircase towards the end of the hike the trail gets steeper and eventually ends. We recommend you go as far as you’re comfortable, but this is a good hike for the adventurous of all ages. We categorized this trail as moderate for the driving adventure alone (and recommend coming in a truck, SUV, or other 4W drive vehicle)!
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Chico Seed Orchard
Chico. 1 mile loop. Accessible year-round. Wheelchair accessible. Dogs allowed on leash.

Also known as the Mendocino National Forest Genetic Resource Center, the Chico Seed Orchard is a paved mile-long loop that’s accessible to the whole family (note: the path is uneven in several spots due to underground roots). There, you’ll find a variety of trees and plants with interpretive signs as well as a beautiful bamboo grove with Comanche Creek running through the area. Once you’ve completed the paved loop, explore the other unofficial, unpaved trails available. The main, drive-in gate is open Monday through Friday from 7am-3pm, while the pedestrian gate is open seven days a week from 7am through 7pm in the summer and from 7am through 5pm in the winter.
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Colby Mountain Lookout/Colby Meadows
Near Butte Meadows. 7.3 - 9.6 mile loop. Accessible May-October. Dogs allowed.

Offering a variety of snow-covered cross-country skiing and snowmobiling trails in the winter, Colby Mountain Lookout/Colby Meadows is just as fun when explored on foot. It’s higher elevation location makes it a great spot for summer hikes, with lots of shade and cooler temperatures compared to the valley below. Enjoy a shorter, intermediate hike by staying on the trails in Colby Meadows south of Colby Mountain Lookout, or add a few miles and difficulty by looping around and up to the lookout for expansive views.
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Dan Beebe Trail
Oroville. 11.9 mile point-to-point (shuttle required). Accessible year-round. Dogs not allowed.

Starting at Saddle Dam at Lake Oroville and meandering up Kelly Ridge and past the Lake Oroville Visitor Center, the Dan Beebe Trail takes you on a scenic journey past Oroville Dam down to the Lakeland Trailhead near Downtown Oroville. The equestrian-accessible trail features lake and river views, beautiful spring greenery, and nice views from the top of Sycamore Hill. You’ll want to set up a shuttle to drop you off at the start and pick you up at the end.

If you’re not quite ready to tackle all 12 miles at once, start at the Oroville Dam Upper Overlook Day Use Area to either head east to Saddle Dam for a roughly 5-mile hike or head west to the Lakeland Trailhead for a 7-mile adventure.
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Gray Lodge Wildlife Area Loop
Gridley. 1.8 mile loop. Accessible year-round. Lands Pass required (complete online or pay in cash on-site). Dogs allowed on leash.

You’ll find two easy, flat trails at the Gray Lodge—the first is the main 1.8-mile unpaved trail, the second is a wheelchair accessible paved trail that you can add to the main trail to slightly extend your trek. This is a great spot for those with kids, those looking for an easy stroll, and those looking for an amazing bird watching location during the winter months, with peak birding November through January (so bring your binoculars!). Mosquitos are abundant, so make sure to bring bug spray, especially if you visit around dusk.
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Jonesville Canyon
Jonesville. 3.8 mile out-and-back. Best used May-October. Dogs allowed.

The Jonesville Canyon trail takes you near the headwaters of Butte Creek. Even though it’s one of the lowest elevation High Country hikes in Butte County, you’ll still get the benefits of a cooler summer hike compared to the heat in the Valley below. You’ll enjoy wildflower blooms later into the summer up here, starting in June and peaking in July, and spectacular falls colors in October. Be prepared for two creek crossings, which may be dangerous to cross early in the season. You’ll find them relatively safe to cross when the snow at the Humbug Weather Station has dropped to zero. The access road is also closed due to snow annually, so make sure to plan your visit accordingly.
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Monkey Face Loop
Chico. Around 1 mile, but mileage can vary. Best used February-May. Dogs allowed on leash.

Overlooking Bidwell Park from the top, the Monkey Face Loop is one of the most trails popular in the park. Generally accessible year-round, you’ll enjoy it the most April through May and September through November when it’s dry and not too hot. Though the trail is rocky, it’s still easily accessed by most, with great views without much exertion, though a steep 300-feet elevation gain offers the right amount of challenge. Everyone in the family will love looking out over the park and getting the perfect sunset photo for social media. From parking lot E, take one of the many trails up to the face exploring the outcroppings.
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Paradise Lake
Magalia. Easy. $3 Parking Fee. $10 boating fee (electric trolling motors only). Dogs Not Allowed. Closed on Wednesdays. Best April-November. Poor cell service; make sure to take a photo for check-in if needed.

Paradise Lake is a postcard picture of a serene forested lake with canoes lazily drifting atop glassy water. With 244 acres, there’s plenty of space to explore the calm waters on a kayak, canoe, or row-boat. Small boats with electric trolling motors are also allowed. Fishers will also find Paradise Lake a quiet spot for dropping a line, whether from the water or along the shore.

To enjoy your time on the water, make sure all you, and everyone you're with, is able to swim and wears a personal flotation device/life jacket. If the location is new to you, first scout the location so you know where to get on and off the water.
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Phantom Falls
Oroville. 4.2 mile out-and-back. Best used November-April. Lands Pass Required $4.58. Dogs allowed on leash.

While finding the trail is a little tricky, once you do find it, the hike to Phantom Falls is a fairly easy one. The waterfall runs during the rainy season, and in the spring, wildflowers carpet the North Table Mountain Ecological Reserve. There’s no shade, so make sure to wear a hat and sunscreen, and you’ll definitely want to go early to avoid the crowds during peak wildflower season.

This is a cross country trail, and it is highly recommended that you download the free Avenza map below, before beginning your hike. From the parking area follow the trail straight, and look for a trail going towards your right. Head towards a pile of black rocks and continue North. Follow the cattle grazing trail, searching for a downhill path towards Ravine Falls. Depending on what season you go, Ravine Falls might be dried up but there is clear signage for it when you get there. Then you will make your way up a mild incline and across the rolling hills towards Phantom Falls. Even if Phantom Falls is dry, you’ll know you’ve arrived because of the panoramic views of the canyon. It is easy to get lost on the cross-country trail, so make sure you check in with your map regularly, and make sure your GPS point is following the trail. *Please note that we have described the cross country-route on the Avenza map to ensure that you stay on CDFW land.
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Roy Rogers-Loafer Creek Loop
Oroville. Moderate. 5 mile loop, Accessible year-round, Park at Brooks Orchard Picnic Area.

By itself, the Roy Rogers Trail is a two-mile trail that connects via the northern part of the Loafer Creek Loop, but it is often combined with the aforementioned Loafer Creek trail to create an approximately 5-mile loop. Along the whole loop, you’ll likely pass equestrians also enjoying the trail while enjoying lake views. Starting at Brooks Orchard, the trail is more challenging, with a stretch of frequent ups and downs, but is otherwise mild the rest of the way.
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Yahi Trail
Chico. 7.9 mile out-and-back. Accessible year-round. Dogs allowed on leash.

There are plenty of reasons why the pedestrian-only Yahi Trail is one of the most popular hikes in Bidwell Park: a variety of micro-environments, Big Chico Creek, large shady sycamores, and beautiful spring wildflower blooms. You’ll find great spots to stop for picnics, swim in the creek, and lay out and relax. Make sure to bring a swimsuit and water shoes for enjoying a dip in one of the many natural swimming holes you’ll pass. If you’re looking for a change of scenery on the way back, walk back along Upper Park Road instead of returning along the creek.

If you don't have time for the full Yahi Trail experience, it's only about 1.5 miles to the iconic Bear Hole from the start of the trail.
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Yellowstone Kelly Heritage Trail
Paradise. 4.3 point-to-point; shuttle required. Accessible year-round. Dogs allowed on leash.

Starting at the Paradise Depot Museum, the Yellowstone Kelly Heritage Trail (formerly the Paradise Memorial Trailway) offers a converted, paved “rails-to-trails” path that runs parallel to Skyway for much of its length. Along the five-mile trail, you’ll encounter sections featuring dense tree cover that creates a lovely illusion of wilderness in the suburban setting and sections where with minimal tree coverage or shade, so prepare accordingly.

To make this an easier outing, drive to the northern trailhead in Magalia near the intersection of Pentz Rd. and Skyway so that you’re walking downhill most of the way.

Want a challenging trek? Double it by making it an out-and-back instead of arranging for a point-to-point pickup. Or, start at the northern trailhead so that you walk uphill on the return trip.

You can also make it more challenging by going to the south trailhead, located at the “Town of Paradise - Welcome” sign at the intersection of Skyway and Neal Rd., you’ll find nearby shopping centers with ample parking.
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Bike

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Temporarily closed due to construction

Keefer Road Loop (12 miles)
Chico. Road Cycling. Moderate hills. 12 mile loop. Accessible year-round.

On the Keefer Road Loop, you’ll ride over an abandoned railroad bridge, pass the Chico Airport, and pedal by scenic pasturelands. Starting on the bike path at 11th Avenue and Esplanade, the rails-to-trail bike path heads north, which will take you to Fortress Street at the airport. Turn left and ride until it ends at Ryan Avenue, and then take that until taking a left onto Cohasset. On Cohasset, enjoy a few short hills before turning left onto Keefer, which will produce a short but sweet downhill to Hicks Lane and another left turn. Hicks Lane travels south through mostly unused pasturelands adjacent to the airport runways until it comes to Eaton Road. A left on Eaton takes you back to the bike path you came out on.
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Bidwell Canyon
Oroville. Mountain Bike. Moderate. 9.5 mile out-and-back. Accessible year-round.

Starting at the Bidwell Canyon Trailhead near the Oroville Dam and riding out to Saddle Dam Day Use Area and back, you’ll enjoy this ride with great views of Lake Oroville on Bidwell Canyon Trail (aka, Kelly Ridge Point Trail). The starting climb will be a bit strenuous on a new rider but it's short and the remainder of the ride is fairly flat, making this a great beginners singletrack. And the views at Kelly Ridge Point make this a ride worth taking for anyone—you’ll see the back side of Oroville Dam, the Bidwell Bar Suspension Bridge and can even dip your toes in the water (when levels are high) before returning. Feel free to stop by the Lake Oroville Visitor Center for another great view on the lookout tower. The Dan Beebe Trail, which is equestrian and hiker only, joins this trail multiple times, so make sure to stay on the Bidwell Canyon trail at each split.
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Brad Freeman trail
Oroville. Mountain Bike. Moderate. 41 mile loop. Accessible year-round.

The 41-mile Brad Freeman Trail is an extensive loop trail that offers the opportunity to push yourself and up your mileage. The trail will take you across the city of Oroville, where you’ll enjoy a variety of scenic vistas and sights as you ride along Oroville Dam, through an old Western Pacific Railroad tunnel, by the Oroville Wildlife Area, and more. Expect a mixture of paved, graveled, and dirt paths.
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Center Gap, Centerville (53 miles)
Chico-Paradise Ridge. Mountain Bike. Serious/Technical. 50 mile loop. Inaccessible when there's snow. Poor cell service; make sure to take a photo for check-in if needed.

Get a serious climb in with the Center Gap-Humbug Loop, a mix-terrain ride that features an elevation change of 4,000 feet. Cyclists who are both comfortable with road riding and mountain biking will find this a fun route.

Starting anywhere in Lower Bidwell Park, make your way south to Skyway to make the left onto the iconic Honey Run Road. Here, push yourself on the windy single-lane road (make sure to watch for cars and share the road). In many places along Honey Run, you’ll be able to enjoy beautiful, scenic creek views. Just after passing the old Honey Run Covered Bridge, turn left at the intersection onto Centerville Road. The climb really begins here, and you’ll have two distinct climbs to contend with. If you’d like a break, enjoy the beauty at Butte Creek Forks Recreation Area before your final climb.
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Durham Loop (20-25 miles)
Chico & Durham. Road Cycling. Flat, 20-25 mile loop. Accessible year-round.

With few cars on these country roads, a ride on Durham Loop is a pleasant and quiet one.

Starting at Durham’s Community Park, head west on Durham-Dayton Hwy through the quaint town of Durham until you reach the quiet roads of Burdick (to continue straight) until you turn left onto Troxel, where you will be amongst the rows of almond trees.

Troxel becomes Duncan before you come to Aguas Frias Rd. Take a right turn up to the Dayton “Four Corners” intersection. Here, you can continue north onto Dayton Road and ride into downtown Chico, or take a right for more orchard views. If you go right, consider a stop by Nascere Vineyards for some wine before you continue your ride to Fimple Rd. Turn left on Fimple and enjoy a quiet ride amongst trees before turning right on Hegan Lane, cycling past Chico State’s University Farm. Hegan will end at a stop light, cross through the intersection and hop on the bike path back to Durham.Take a left onto Jones Ave. Turn left onto Durham Dayton Hwy and take a right to bring you back to Durham Community Park.
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Fast 50 (31 miles)
Chico, Road: Flat, 31 mile loop. Accessible year-round.

Start at the “Decide & Ride” monument in Lower Bidwell Park near Sycamore Pool. Cross the bridge and head towards Woodland Ave. Follow Woodland Ave. and veer left onto East 5th St. Pass through classic Chico neighborhoods and by the City Plaza until the road turns into Chico River Road, where you will notice you come out of the city and into agricultural land. Take a left onto Liberty Ln. to begin your loop. Take a left onto Lone Pine Ave. Follow until you see a sign for Elk Ave and take a left, and continue straight onto Hegan Ln. Take a right onto Fimple Road. Follow until you reach Durham Dayton Hwy and turn right (this is a great road for late-winter almond blossom viewing).

Look for Troxel Road on your left for some of the most peaceful roads in Butte County. Troxel turns into Duncan for one short block, and then you end up on Aguas Frias Rd. At the intersection turn left onto Ord Ferry Road, and follow until you see River Road and turn right (River Road will eventually turn into Chico River Road). Enjoy the scenic agricultural landscape before heading back into town. Stop in Chico for a beer and refreshments, or ride down W 5th St. back to One Mile Recreation Area for a dip in the pool.
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Guardian and Annie Bidwell Loop
Chico. Mountain: Serious/Technical. 8.6 mile loop. Accessible year-round but closed during wet weather.

With the loop being either all uphill or all downhill, the Guardian and Annie Bidwell Trail (formerly known as the South Rim) is recommended for advanced riders in great shape. Guardian Trail is an extremely exposed singletrack, featuring cliff edges in some areas and amazing views of the gorge. Annie Bidwell Trail (South Rim) Trail is extremely rocky and very technical, with several drop-offs of more than 4 feet along a washout. Start down a steep fire road at 10 Mile House Trail, take the left turnoff to ride down Guardian Trail. When Guardian Trail ends at South Rim Trail, bear right (north) for a steep descent to the Annie Bidwell Trail. Keep right for the Ten Mile House Road and back to where you began.
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Midway Bike Path
Chico & Durham. Road Cycling. Flat/Easy/Beginner. 6 miles out-and-back. Accessible year-round. Park at the Silver Dollar Fairgrounds.

Running parallel to the Midway that connects Chico and Durham, the scenic Midway Bike Path is a mixed-use path that takes users through the seemingly endless orchards of south Chico heading towards Durham. The paved trail is perfect for wheelchair users or others with mobility issues. The path ends at Jones Avenue just a few miles north of Durham but many cyclists will continue on and find loop options along Butte County’s many country roads.
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River Road (16 miles)
Chico. Road. Flat. 16 mile loop. Accessible year-round.

The flat, short River Road loop takes you through the scenery that makes up the bulk of riding in the Chico area—walnut and almond orchards.

Starting at Chico State, ride southwest until you reach Ivy St. Make a left, ride a few blocks, and then turn right onto West 5th St., which will eventually turn into Chico River Rd. A right onto River Road will take you near the Sacramento River with beautiful views. Enjoy until taking a right onto West Sacramento Ave.

For a slightly longer but quieter ride through lush walnut orchards, take a left on Meridian Rd. followed by a right onto Oak Way. After a short ride, turn right onto Glenwood Ave. and then cross over West Sacramento Ave. to get onto Bidwell Ave. Stay left for Stewart Ave. and use the crosswalk to cross Nord Ave. (CA-32) and turn left (north). Turn right at the next crosswalk/light onto a bike path that will take you towards the Chico State tennis courts. Cross the railroad tracks and take right before the courts and then a left to follow Big Chico Creek. Following the path will take you back to Chico State and Downtown Chico, where you can return to your car or continue exploring.
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Table Mountain Loop (50-60 miles)
Chico-Oroville. Road Cycling. Moderate Hills. 50-60 mile loop. Available year-round.

A remnant of an ancient lava flow, the North Table Mountain Ecological Reserve truly is table-like on top, with steep, vertical cliffs at the edges that produce unique waterfalls in the early spring along with an abundance of wildflowers, making the Table Mountain Loop one of the prettiest rides around.

For this ride, start in Chico, ride south on the Midway Bike Path to Oroville Chico Hwy, then south to Pentz Rd. and west past Butte College to Hwy 70. At Hwy 70, make a left and travel up the hill for less than a mile to Cherokee Rd. A challenging climb takes you through the old town of Cherokee and onwards to the top of Table Mountain proper. You will know when you get to the top—it is as flat as a table.

The continued ride down to the outskirts of Oroville can be dangerous for larger groups, (so they should climb up from the Oroville side and go down through Cherokee) but for a single rider or small group who know the downhill is challenging, the Cherokee-Oroville direction is more satisfying.

Once at the end of Cherokee Rd, make a right on Table Mountain Blvd. and follow it to its end. Make a right on Hwy 70 for a mile or so and make another right onto Coal Canyon Rd. This quiet road ends up crossing Hwy 70 again in a couple of miles and changes into Wheelock Rd. which dead ends back into Durham-Pentz Rd. where a left turn takes you back to Butte College and ultimately Chico.
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Paddle

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Feather River Through Oroville
Oroville. Easy. Best March-June and September-early November.

The Feather River running through Oroville offers relatively calm waters perfect for family-friendly kayaking explorations. Launching at the Feather River Fish Hatchery under the Table Mountain Boulevard Bridge, you’ll enjoy a relaxing two-mile paddle to Riverbend Park. If you find yourself on the water September-October or May-June, you’ll also see fall- and spring-run salmon swimming alongside you.

To enjoy your time on the water, make sure all you, and everyone you're with, is able to swim and wears a personal flotation device/life jacket. If the location is new to you, first scout the location so you know where to get on and off the water.
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North Thermalito Forebay
Oroville. Easy. $8 Parking Fee. Dogs Not Allowed on the beach and turf areas. Accessible year-round, with rentals available in the Summer.

The Thermalito Forebay North features 300 surface acres of water, a 200-yard swimming area with a sandy beach, and plenty of shade. Reserved exclusively for sailboats, canoes, kayaks, paddle boards, and other non-power driven boats, it's a great place for water enthusiasts of all ages to enjoy. For those needing rentals, the Forebay Aquatic Center is conveniently located just past the beach area and has a variety of paddle rentals. The Forebay Aquatic Center is generally open Memorial Day through Labor Day; check their website for current hours of operation.

To enjoy your time on the water, make sure all you, and everyone you're with, is able to swim and wears a personal flotation device/life jacket. If the location is new to you, first scout the location so you know where to get on and off the water.
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Paradise Lake
Magalia. Easy. $3 Parking Fee. $10 boating fee (electric trolling motors only). Dogs Not Allowed. Closed on Wednesdays. Best April-November. Poor cell service; make sure to take a photo for check-in if needed.

Paradise Lake is a postcard picture of a serene forested lake with canoes lazily drifting atop glassy water. With 244 acres, there’s plenty of space to explore the calm waters on a kayak, canoe, or row-boat. Small boats with electric trolling motors are also allowed. Fishers will also find Paradise Lake a quiet spot for dropping a line, whether from the water or along the shore.

To enjoy your time on the water, make sure all you, and everyone you're with, is able to swim and wears a personal flotation device/life jacket. If the location is new to you, first scout the location so you know where to get on and off the water.
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Sacramento River
Chico. Easy. Best May-September.

The Sacramento River is California’s largest river, and Butte County’s share of it showcases some of the best river recreation in the state. These twists and turns are home to legendary tubing adventures and spectacular boating and fishing opportunities. Irvine Finch Boat Ramp Access is the classic starting point for tubing adventures, with Big Chico Creek Day-Use Area another option for launching non-motorized vessels (or staying on shore at “Wash-Out” Beach).

To enjoy your time on the water, make sure all you, and everyone you're with, is able to swim and wears a personal flotation device/life jacket. If the location is new to you, first scout the location so you know where to get on and off the water.
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Thermalito Afterbay
Oroville. Easy. No parking fees. Dogs are allowed but must be leashed during nesting season (March 15th-June 30th).

A diversion pool downstream of Lake Oroville, the Thermalito Afterbay is great for boaters and paddlers. With 17 miles of shoreline and 4,300 surface acres of water, the Afterbay is open for boating, swimming, fishing, picnicking, and limited hunting. No-wake speed limits before and after sunset allow for peaceful paddling, swimming and fishing. While similar to the Thermalito Forebay, the Afterbay allows more extensive motorized watercraft use and has a greater focus on preservation and enhancement of wildlife habitat areas.

To enjoy your time on the water, make sure all you, and everyone you're with, is able to swim and wears a personal flotation device/life jacket. If the location is new to you, first scout the location so you know where to get on and off the water.
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Save

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Almendra Winery & Distillery
Durham
Almendra Winery & Distillery blends wine country elegance with a hometown feel! Enter the family friendly restaurant and tasting room and you’ll immediately experience the unique, warm and rustic ambiance of this upscale winery and distillery. Custom hardwood accents adorn the entire facility and each table and piece of furniture tells a story.

Family owned and operated, Almendra Winery & Distillery features locally grown wine and spirits. Every bottle exemplifies the region's amazing flavors and products.

Enjoy local musicians in the tasting room every Thursday evening from 6:30 - 8:30 p.m. You can view our entire list of upcoming events by visiting our website. If you’re looking to host an event, Almendra Winery & Distillery is the perfect location. We look forward to seeing you in the tasting room!
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What's Included

  • 1/2 Off A Wine Or Spirit Tasting Flight
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Forebay Aquatic Center
The Forebay Aquatic Center is a nonprofit organization located in northern California. We exist as a collaborative effort between the Table Mountain Rowing Club, Butte Sailing Club, CSU Chico Rowing Club, and California Department of Parks & Recreation: Boating & Waterways.

What's Included

  • 10% Off Rental Price
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Secret Trail Brewing Company
Local Brewery where all the beer is made on the premises. Cool taproom and large patios with a very friendly vibe.

What's Included

  • 20% Off A Pint Of Beer
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Union
Union is located in downtown Oroville with a inside/outside bar, outdoor patio, and beer garden. The Union has a stage, where we bring local and traveling acts for our music series. Unions menu is focused on California cuisine using only the freshest local ingredients. We believe we are a premier northern California destination a place where you can bring family and friends and enjoy great drinks, great food, and great entertainment. We hope to see you soon!
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What's Included

  • 1/2 Off One Appetizer
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Upper Park Clothing
California clothing for the trails and pavement.

What's Included

  • 10% Off Your Order